Departmental Results Report 2022-2023

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The Honourable Dominic LeBlanc, P.C., K.C., M.P.
Minister of Public Safety, Democratic Institutions
and Intergovernmental Affairs

ISSN 2561-2425

From the Chairperson

Professional photo of Michelain

I am pleased to present the Civilian Review and Complaints Commission's Departmental Results Report for fiscal year 2022-2023. This report provides an overview of our accomplishments, challenges, and progress in fulfilling our mandate to provide independent civilian review of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP).

Over the past year, the Commission has upheld its commitment to the impartial and transparent review of complaints against the RCMP, ensuring that the actions of the police are held to the highest standards. Independent review increases public confidence in police activities.

The Commission successfully resolved a significant number of complaints, providing individuals with a fair and impartial process to address their concerns. Through rigorous investigations, we ensure accountability, and promote public trust in the RCMP. Our efforts contribute to improving the quality of policing services across the country.

In addition to complaint resolution, the Commission actively engaged with stakeholders, including community organizations, advocacy groups, and government agencies. These partnerships have been instrumental in enhancing our understanding of the issues faced by individuals and communities, enabling us to identify systemic concerns and recommend meaningful reforms. We remain committed to fostering collaboration and building strong relationships that promote effective oversight and accountability in policing.

While we celebrate our achievements, we also acknowledge the challenges that lie ahead. The evolving landscape of policing demands ongoing adaptation and innovation. Our commitment to continuous improvement is unwavering, and we will proactively address emerging issues to ensure that our oversight functions remain relevant, effective, and responsive to the needs of Canadians.

Looking forward, we are excited about the opportunities that await us. We will continue to explore new ways to engage with the public, leveraging technology and data to streamline our processes, and enhance the accessibility and transparency of our work. We will strive to become more agile, efficient, and proactive in fulfilling our mandate, setting the benchmark for civilian oversight bodies worldwide.

I would like to express my deepest gratitude to the dedicated employees of the Commission, whose unwavering commitment to excellence has made our accomplishments possible. I would also like to extend my appreciation to the complainants, stakeholders, and partners who have contributed their valuable insights and supported our efforts.

In closing, I would like to assure Canadians that we remain resolute in our pursuit of accountability and transparency within the RCMP through a robust complaints process. The Commission will continue to support all efforts for improved conduct and service in law enforcement.

Michelaine Lahaie
Chairperson

Results at a glance

Departmental Totals

Actual Spending

$12,479,661

Actual FTEs

81

2022-23 Key Results

  • The Commission received 4002 public complaints and issued 292 complaint review reports.
  • The Commission launched two systemic reviews into:
    • the Handling of Public Complaints by RCMP in Nunavut
    • the Activities and Operations of the RCMP "E" Division Community-Industry Response Group
  • The Commission launched a Chairperson Initiated Complaint and a public interest investigation into:
    • the RCMP's Arrest and Detention of an Alberta Teen
    • the RCMP Handling of Sexual Assault Report and Death of a Nova Scotia Woman

The CRCC's reviews led to consequential recommendations for changes to policies, procedures and training of the RCMP.  Key CRCC recommendations accepted by the RCMP include:

  • Amending national policy to require that next-of-kin notifications be done in person unless doing so is not appropriate or feasible in the circumstances.
  • Continuing in its commitment to implement cultural awareness training, without delay.
  • Improving policies, practices, and training to be more responsive to the needs of those experiencing problematic substance use concerns.
  • Providing direction to all RCMP members to remind them of their obligations to investigate criminal allegations made by inmates in correctional facilities within RCMP jurisdiction.
  • Developing a national policy on wellness checks.
  • Expanding the use of trained mental health professionals to assist with police in responding to mental health crises.
  • Providing operational guidance about microaggressions.

The CRCC's funding annual allocation was increased by way of a Programme Integrity request.  This additional funding enabled the CRCC to address human resource shortfalls that had resulted in backlogs in the CRCC's core function areas, specifically, Complaint Intake and Review.  With this funding, the CRCC was also able to launch a systemic investigation into the Activities and Operations of the RCMP "E" Division's Community-Industry Response Group (C-IRG).Footnote i

Bill C-20 – An Act establishing the Public Complaints and Review Commission and amending certain Acts and statutory instrumentsFootnote ii was introduced and advanced to second reading before being sent to Committee.  This Act replaces the current CRCC with the Public Complaints and Review Commission (PCRC), an enhanced independent review body for both the RCMP and the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA). The CRCC continued planning for the transition with current resources, while awaiting approval and funding of the proposed legislation.

For more information on the Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the RCMP's plans, priorities and results achieved, see the "Results: what we achieved" section of this report.

Results: what we achieved

Core responsibilities

Independent Review of the RCMP

Description

The CRCC's fundamental role is to provide civilian review of the conduct of RCMP members in carrying out their policing duties, thereby holding the RCMP accountable to the public. The CRCC ensures that complaints about the conduct of RCMP members are examined fairly and impartially. Its findings and recommendations help identify and remedy policing problems that stem from the conduct of individual RCMP members or from deficiencies in RCMP policies, procedures or training. The CRCC also conducts reviews of specified RCMP activities, reports to provinces that contract RCMP services and conducts research, program outreach and public education.

Results

During this reporting period, the CRCC continued to experience a high demand for the services associated to its core functions—receiving, processing and monitoring public complaints, and independently reviewing the RCMP's handling of public complaints.

In 2022-23, 4,022 public complaints were lodged against the RCMP. The CRCC received 97% of these complaints directly, with the remainder submitted through the RCMP. The CRCC failed to meet its 30 business day service standard for processing public complaints and forwarding them to the RCMP in 80% of the cases, with only 65% of complaints received meeting the service standard. This decline has resulted from a change to the way that CRCC calculates its service standard.

Early in fiscal year 2022-23, the CRCC conducted a reorganization that merged the both the teams and the processes for the intake of complaints and requests for review.  During this effort it was noted that the data points used to measure the service standard were not ideal. It is now based solely on the date of receipt of a complaint rather than the date that all of the information necessary to process the complaint has been obtained. 

New resources, as a result of the program integrity funding, were applied to the organization.  Further efforts to improve the processing of complaints and return to meeting the service standard targets included the conduct of a Lean Six Sigma review.  The review recommended efforts to streamline processes and identified that the current case management system is dated and difficult to master.  New staff were struggling to learn complaint processes often driven by the system.  The CRCC accepted recommendations to improve processes and training, and is procuring a modern complaints management system. 

In this same period, the CRCC received 234 new requests for review of the RCMP's disposition of public complaints. The CRCC issued 292 complaint review reports. This included 184 Satisfied Reports, 59 Interim Reports and 49 Final Reports. The RCMP Commissioner accepted 84% of the CRCC's remedial recommendations and 85% of adverse findings.

The complexity and scope of the complaints, reviews and investigations have challenged the CRCC's ability to meet the performance indicator targets outlined in the Departmental Results Framework. These targets recognize that to effectively address public concerns about the RCMP, investigations and reviews must be completed in as timely a manner as possible. The CRCC continues to work towards its goals.

The CRCC's 10-day service standard for requests for review to be sent to the RCMP was met in 86% of cases. The 30-day standard for delivery of Final Reports was met in 91% of cases. The completion of Satisfied and Interim Reports within 120 days of receipt of all relevant materials from the RCMP was achieved in only 38% of cases. This represents a slight decline from the previous year's rate of 43%.

As a result of a large number of Commissioner's responses received in 2021-2022, the CRCC prioritized the completion of final reports.  This prioritization led to a backlog in more recent files.  Resources from the program integrity funding were specifically applied to address the backlog and support public interest investigations.  Continued efforts are being made to improve this result.

In 2022-23, the CRCC did not release any public interest investigation or systemic investigation reports but did initiate two public interest investigations and two systemic investigations.  A Chairperson Initiated Complaint resulted in the investigation of the RCMP's Arrest and Detention of an Alberta TeenFootnote iii and a public interest investigation into the RCMP Handling of Sexual Assault Report and Death of a Nova Scotia WomanFootnote iv was launched.  The two systemic investigations were into the Handling of Public Complaints by RCMP in NunavutFootnote v and the Activities and Operations of the RCMP "E" Division C-IRG.Footnote vi

Gender-based analysis plus

Gender-based analysis plus (GBA+) is considered in the development and delivery of the CRCC's programs and services. For instance, GBA+ had shown that individuals in particular communities (i.e., Indigenous and racialized communities, remote communities) may face barriers in accessing the CRCC's services.  This analysis was a key reason for the launch of a systemic review into the handling of the public complaints process in Nunavut.

Leveraging analysis of the CRCC's Inclusion, Diversity and Equity Advisory Committee (IDEAC) on accessibility, the CRCC released its Accessibility Action PlanFootnote vii and feedback process.  The CRCC continues to examine its services for accessibility, to ensure equal access to the complaint process for all Canadians.

The legislative progress of Bill C-20 – An Act establishing the Public Complaints and Review Commission and amending certain Acts and statutory instrumentsFootnote viii requires future Annual Reports to include "data about complainants, including disaggregated race-based data, in a form that prevents data obtained from an identifiable person from being related to that person."

The CRCC is undertaking a project to modernize its information systems and business processes, to enable the collection and analysis of disaggregated intersectional data and ensure that its policies and decisions benefit all of the communities that it serves. The collection and analysis of disaggregated data will allow the CRCC to report publicly on a broader spectrum of data and thereby enhance the accountability and transparency of both the RCMP and the CRCC.

United Nations 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the Sustainable Development Goals

The Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) did not include departmental sustainable development goals in its 2022-23 Departmental Plan.  As a micro-agency there is limited ability for the CRCC to contribute to key Sustainable Development Goals of the United Nations 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.  Nonetheless the CRCC will develop a Departmental Sustainability Development Plan for 2023-24 and report next year.

In addition to the responsible consumption and climate change efforts expected by all staff within the CRCC, additional support to the United Nations 2030 Agenda and the Sustainable Development Goals include promoting accountability, reducing inequalities, and protecting human rights, to advance sustainable development in the context of law enforcement and public safety.

Innovation

In an effort to improve business processes, the CRCC conducted a Lean Six Sigma review of the operational lines handling the complaints process and the reviews process.  Many of the recommendations were implemented with a plan for further implementation.

The CRCC has also made significant process in leveraging cloud technologies in order to improve internal operations, collaborative efforts, system reliability and security.  These efforts were based upon another Lean Six Sigma review of Information Management and Information Technology support and operations in the CRCC.

Key risks

Through the 2022-23 Supplementary Estimates "B" the CRCC received an increase to annual reference levels resulting from a program integrity funding request.  The timing of the funds and the limited existing corporate services resources, and availability of suitable and interested candidates resulted in an inability to fill all planned positions to further support the CRCC's mandate.  The shortage of staff and challenges associated with staffing vacant positions was, and remains, a risk.

Results achieved

The following table shows, for Independent Review of the RCMP, the results achieved, the performance indicators, the targets and the target dates for 2022–23, and the actual results for the three most recent fiscal years for which actual results are available.

Departmental results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target

2020–21
Actual results

2021–22 Actual results 2022–23
Actual results

Public complaints dealt with in a timely manner

% of complaints processed within CRCC service standard

80%

March 2023

97%

97%

65%

% of reviews completed within CRCC service standards

80%

March 2023

63%

43%

38%

Public Interest Investigations and reviews of specified RCMP activities conducted in a timely manner

% of CRCC Public Interest Investigation Interim Reports completed within one year of initiation of the investigation

70%

March 2023

0%

0%

0%

% of specified activity reviews completed within one year of initiation of the review

70%

March 2023

0%

0%

0%

Increased public awareness of and confidence in the CRCC

% of complaints filed directly with the CRCC instead of the RCMP

60%

March 2023

94%

95%

97%

% increase of public confidence in the complaint process over a two-year period

N/A*

N/A*

N/A*

NA*

NA*

*Note: Data for this indicator is unavailable.

Financial, human resources and performance information for Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the RCMP's Program Inventory is available in GC InfoBase.Footnote ix

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)

The following table shows, for Independent Review of the RCMP, budgetary spending for 2022–23, as well as actual spending for that year.

2022–23
Main Estimates

2022–23
Planned spending

2022–23
Total authorities available for use

2022–23
Actual spending
(authorities used)

2022–23
Difference
(Actual spending minus Planned spending)

6,809,822

6,809,822

8,664,073

8,074,291

1,264,469

Financial, human resources and performance information for Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the RCMP's Program Inventory is available in GC InfoBase.Footnote x

Human resources (full-time equivalents)

The following table shows, in full‑time equivalents, the human resources the department needed to fulfill this core responsibility for 2022–23.

2022–23
Planned full-time equivalents

2022–23
Actual full-time equivalents

2022–23
Difference
(Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)

56

59

3

Financial, human resources and performance information for the Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the RCMP's Program Inventory is available in GC InfoBaseFootnote xi.

Internal Services

Description

Internal services are those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct service categories that support program delivery in the organization, regardless of the internal services delivery model in a department. The 10 service categories are:

  • acquisition management services
  • communication services
  • financial management services
  • human resources management services
  • information management services
  • information technology services
  • legal services
  • material management services
  • management and oversight services
  • real property management services

The CRCC's resources for administrative structures, tools and processes continued to focus on supporting the delivery of its priorities. By streamlining business processes and employing strategies and technologies that enhance operational efficiency it strives to reduce the internal services costs.

Key results for this reporting period include:

  • Continued the modernization of the CRCC's IT infrastructure and transitioning to cloud based services.
  • Performed a security review and risk diagnostic to address critical gaps in security controls.
  • Continued progressing the procurement process to modernize the case management system.
  • Recruitment, retention and promotion of employees of different employment equity groups to improve diversity, equity and inclusion within the CRCC.
  • Continued support to improve employee health and wellness, mental health and workplace health.

Contracts awarded to Indigenous businesses

The Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the RCMP is a Phase 3 organization and is aiming to achieve the minimum 5% target by the end of 2024-25.

Though not mandated to meet the target in fiscal year 2022-23, the CRCC spent approximately 28% of its total contracting on goods and services from Indigenous businesses. The CRCC will continue to engage with Indigenous suppliers and explore additional strategies to meet Government of Canada targets.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)

The following table shows, for internal services, budgetary spending for 2022–23, as well as spending for that year.

2022–23
Main Estimates

2022–23
Planned spending

2022–23
Total authorities available for use

2022–23
Actual spending
(authorities used)

2022–23
Difference
(actual spending minus planned spending)

3,666,827

3,666,827

4,405,370

4,405,370

738,543

Human resources (full-time equivalents)

The following table shows, in full‑time equivalents, the human resources the department needed to carry out its internal services for 2022–23.

2022–23
Planned full-time equivalents

2022–23
Actual full-time equivalents

2022–23
Difference
(actual full-time equivalents
minus Planned full-time equivalents)

20

22

2

Spending and human resources

Spending

Spending 2020-21 to 2025-26

The following graph presents planned (voted and statutory spending) over time.

Departmental spending trend graph

The variance between fiscal year 2021-22 and 2022-23 and ongoing is primarily attributable to program integrity funding received through the 2022-23 Supplementary Estimates (B).

Text Version
Spending Trend (dollars)
  2020-2021 2021-2022 2022-2023 2023-2024 2024-2025 2025-2026
Statutory 1,218,481 1,135,212 1,286,835 1,573,860 1,573,860 1,573,860
Voted 10,197,756 9,395,423 11,192,826 14,133,193 14,133,193 14,133,193
Total 11,416,237 10,530,635 12,479,661 15,707,053 15,707,053 15,707,053

Budgetary performance summary for core responsibilities and internal services (dollars)

The "Budgetary performance summary for core responsibilities and internal services" table presents the budgetary financial resources allocated for the Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the RCMP's core responsibilities and for internal services.

Budgetary performance summary for Core Responsibilities and Internal Services (dollars)

Core responsibilities and Internal Services

2022–23
Main Estimates

2022–23
Planned spending

2023–24
Planned spending

2024–25
Planned spending

2022–23
Total authorities available for use

2020–21
Actual spending (authorities used)

2021–22
Actual spending (authorities used)

2022–23
Actual spending (authorities used)

Independent Review of the RCMP

6,809,822

6,809,822

10,045,719

10,045,719

8,664,073

6,681,242

6,369,451

8,074,291

Subtotal

6,809,822

6,809,822

10,045,719

10,045,719

8,664,073

6,681,242

6,369,451

8,074,291

Internal Services

3,666,827

3,666,827

5,661,334

5,661,334

4,405,370

4,734,995

4,161,184

4,405,370

Total

10,476,649

10,476,649

15,707,053

15,707,053

13,069,443

11,416,237

11,530,635

12,479,661

The variance between planned and actual spending for fiscal year 2022-23 and 2023-24 and ongoing is primarily attributable to program integrity funding received through Supplementary Estimates (B). The increase in the CRCC's appropriations enabled it to deliver on a number of priorities, including but not limited to:

Human resources

The "Human resources summary for core responsibilities and internal services" table presents the full-time equivalents (FTEs) allocated to each of the Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the RCMP's core responsibilities and to internal services.

Human resources summary for core responsibilities and Internal Service
Core responsibilities and Internal Services 2020–21
Actual full-time equivalents
2021–22
Planned full-time equivalents
2022–23
Planned full-time equivalents
2022–23
Actual full-time equivalents
2023–24
Planned full-time equivalents
2024–25
Planned full-time equivalents

Independent Review of the RCMP

58

54

56

59

74

79

Subtotal

58

54

56

59

74

79

Internal Services

23

20

20

22

29

29

Total

81

74

76

81

103

108

Expenditures by vote

For information on Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the RCMP's organizational voted and statutory expenditures, consult the Public Accounts of Canada 2021.Footnote xiii

Government of Canada spending and activities

Information on the alignment of the Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the RCMP's spending with Government of Canada's spending and activities is available in GC InfoBase.Footnote xiv

Financial statements and financial statements highlights

Financial Statements

The Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the RCMP's financial statements (unaudited) for the year ended March 31, 2023, are available on the department's' website.Footnote xv

Financial statements highlights

Condensed Statement of Operations (unaudited) for the year ended March 31, 2023 (dollars)
Financial information

2022–23
Planned results

2022–23
Actual results

2021–22
Actual results

Difference
(2022–23 Actual results minus
2022–23 Planned results)

Difference
(2022–23 Actual results minus
2021–22 Actual results)

Total expenses

11,801,402

13,935,773

11,848,739

2,134,371

2,087,034

Total revenues

0

0

0

0

0

Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers

17,592,103

13,935,773

11,848,739

(3,656,330)

2,087,034

The 2022–23 planned results information is provided in the Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the RCMP's Future-Oriented Statement of Operations and Notes 2022–23.Footnote xvi

Condensed Statement of Financial Position (unaudited) as of March 31, 2023 (dollars)
Financial information

2022–23

2021–22

Difference
(2022–23 minus
2021–22)

Total net liabilities

1,856,781

1,564,645

292,136

Total net financial assets

1,112,898

777,409

335,489

Departmental net debt

743,883

787,237

(43,354)

Total non-financial assets

95,709

136,567

(40,858)

Departmental net financial position

(648,174)

(650,670)

2,496

The 2022–23 planned results information is provided in the Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the RCMP's Future-Oriented Statement of Operations and Notes 2022–23.Footnote xvii

Corporate information

Organizational profile

Appropriate minister: The Honourable Dominic LeBlanc, P.C., K.C., M.P.

Institutional head: Michelaine Lahaie, Chairperson

Ministerial portfolio: Public Safety

Enabling instrument: Royal Canadian Mounted Police ActFootnote xviii

Year of incorporation / commencement: 2014

Raison d'être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do

"Raison d'être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do" is available on the Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the RCMP's website.Footnote xix

For more information on the department's organizational mandate letter commitments, see the Minister's mandate letter.Footnote xx

Operating context

Information on the operating context is available on Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the RCMP's website.Footnote xxi

Reporting framework

The Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the RCMP's departmental results framework and program inventory of record for 2022–23 are shown below.

Departmental Results
Framework

Core Responsibility 1: Independent review of the RCMP

Internal Services

Departmental Result:
Public complaints dealt with in a timely manner

Indicator: % of complaints processed within CRCC service standards

Indicator: % of reviews completed within CRCC service standards

Departmental Result:
Public Interest Investigations and reviews of specified RCMP activities conducted in a timely manner

Indicator: % of CRCC Public Interest Investigation Interim Reports completed within one year of initiation of the investigation

Indicator: % of specified activity reviews completed within one year of initiation of the review

Departmental Result:
Increased public awareness of and confidence in the CRCC

Indicator: % of complaints filed directly with the CRCC instead of the RCMP

Indicator: % increase of public confidence in the complaint process over a two-year period

 

Program Inventory

Program: Public Complaints

Program: Investigations

Program: Public Education

Supporting information on the program inventory

Financial, human resources and performance information for the Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the RCMP's program inventory is available in GC InfoBase.Footnote xxii

Supplementary information tables

The Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the RCMP does not have any supplementary information tables.

Federal tax expenditures

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures each year in the Report on Federal Tax Expenditures.Footnote xxiii This report also provides detailed background information on tax expenditures, including descriptions, objectives, historical information and references to related federal spending programs as well as evaluations and GBA Plus of tax expenditures.

Organizational contact information

Mail address:
P.O. Box 1722, Station B,
Ottawa, ON K1P 0B3

Telephone: 1-800-665-6878

TTY: 1-866-432-5837

Fax: 613-952-8045

E-mail: Media@crcc-ccetp.gc.ca

Web: http://www.crcc-ccetp.gc.caFootnote xxiv

Appendix: definitions

appropriation (crédit)

Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.

budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires)

Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.

core responsibility (responsabilité essentielle)

An enduring function or role performed by a department. The intentions of the department with respect to a core responsibility are reflected in one or more related departmental results that the department seeks to contribute to or influence.

Departmental Plan (plan ministériel)

A report on the plans and expected performance of an appropriated department over a 3‑year period. Departmental Plans are usually tabled in Parliament each spring.

departmental priority (priorité)

A plan or project that a department has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired departmental results.

departmental result (résultat ministériel)

A consequence or outcome that a department seeks to achieve. A departmental result is often outside departments' immediate control, but it should be influenced by program-level outcomes.

departmental result indicator (indicateur de résultat ministériel)

A quantitative measure of progress on a departmental result.

departmental results framework (cadre ministériel des résultats)

A framework that connects the department's core responsibilities to its departmental results and departmental result indicators.

Departmental Results Report (rapport sur les résultats ministériels)

A report on a department's actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.

full‑time equivalent (équivalent temps plein)

A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person‑year charge against a departmental budget. For a particular position, the full‑time equivalent figure is the ratio of number of hours the person actually works divided by the standard number of hours set out in the person's collective agreement.

gender-based analysis plus (GBA Plus) (analyse comparative entre les sexes plus [ACS Plus])

An analytical tool used to support the development of responsive and inclusive policies, programs and other initiatives; and understand how factors such as sex, race, national and ethnic origin, Indigenous origin or identity, age, sexual orientation, socio-economic conditions, geography, culture and disability, impact experiences and outcomes, and can affect access to and experience of government programs.

government-wide priorities (priorités pangouvernementales)

For the purpose of the 2022–23 Departmental Results Report, government-wide priorities are the high-level themes outlining the government's agenda in the November 23, 2021, Speech from the Throne: building a healthier today and tomorrow; growing a more resilient economy; bolder climate action; fighter harder for safer communities; standing up for diversity and inclusion; moving faster on the path to reconciliation; and fighting for a secure, just and equitable world.

horizontal initiative (initiative horizontale)

An initiative where two or more federal organizations are given funding to pursue a shared outcome, often linked to a government priority.

non‑budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires)

Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.

performance (rendement)

What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.

performance indicator (indicateur de rendement)

A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.

performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement)

The process of communicating evidence‑based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.

plan (plan)

The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally, a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead to the expected result.

planned spending (dépenses prévues)

For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts presented in Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.

program (programme)

Individual or groups of services, activities or combinations thereof that are managed together within the department and focus on a specific set of outputs, outcomes or service levels.

program inventory (répertoire des programmes)

Identifies all the department's programs and describes how resources are organized to contribute to the department's core responsibilities and results.

result (résultat)

A consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization's influence.

Indigenous business (enterprise autochtones)

For the purpose of the Directive on the Management of Procurement Appendix E: Mandatory Procedures for Contracts Awarded to Indigenous Businesses and the Government of Canada's commitment that a mandatory minimum target of 5% of the total value of contracts is awarded to Indigenous businesses, an organization that meets the definition and requirements as defined by the Indigenous Business Directory

statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives)

Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.

target (cible)

A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.

voted expenditures (dépenses votées)

Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an appropriation act. The vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.

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